7 Classic Baking Soda and Vinegar Activities to Do with Your Kids

7 Classic Baking Soda and Vinegar Activities to Do with Your Kids

Inside: Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. This is one of those experiments that can be kept basic or notched up a bit to increase the wow factor.


 

Sometimes all you need to keep your kids busy and put a smile on their faces are a few kitchen staples. The baking soda and vinegar combo is like peanut butter and jelly, chips and salsa, macaroni and cheese, or eggs and bacon. They go so well together that the result is much greater than the sum of its individual parts.

 

Which is a win for both of you!

 

With these activities, your kids will be busy learning and experimenting, and you will have the satisfaction of feeling like a magician.

 

7 Classic Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

Warning: if this is your first time doing these activities or your kids are little, please supervise at all times. I talk more about how to teach vinegar safety at the end of this post.   

 

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Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#1: Basic Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiment

When the vinegar (an acid) is mixed with the baking soda (a base), there is a spectacular chemical reaction that is easily observable to the naked eye. The reaction releases a gas called carbon dioxide, but don’t worry: it’s a safe experiment as long as you follow instructions.

 

What you need 

Baking soda

Vinegar

Container (tall, narrow ones are the best)

Rimmed tray to contain the leaks

(Optional) food coloring

 

What to do

  1. Add some baking soda to a container. If you are using food coloring, add a few drops now.
  2. Pour vinegar on top of baking soda (and food coloring).
  3. Watch how the reaction sizzles and bubbles over the edge.

 

Note: To make it even more fun, use containers of different shapes and sizes simultaneously!

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#2 Volcano Eruption

A Reactant is a substance (or substances) present at the start of the reaction. The Product is a resulting substance (or substances) formed by a chemical reaction. What are the reactant(s) and product(s) in this experiment?

 

What you need

Baking soda

Vinegar

Food coloring

Playdough or LEGO volcano

 

What to do

  1. Add baking soda and food coloring to the container that can fit inside your LEGO volcano or use playdough to cover the container to look like a volcano.
  2. Add the vinegar to the mix.
  3. Watch the eruption!

 

What factors affect the intensity of the reaction? As you think about quality and quantity, don’t forget about the effect of mixing and stirring. What was produced by this chemical reaction? What gas? How can the quantity of gas produced be maximized? (Hint: stir baking soda).

 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#3 Dancing Rice

What do you think will happen to the rice when the water runs out of carbon dioxide bubbles?

What you need

Baking soda – 1 teaspoon

Vinegar – 1 cup (or more)

Warm water – 1 cup

Rice (long grain brown is best)

Clear glass

 

What to do

  1. Add one teaspoon of baking soda to glass. Stir it well.
  2. Add a few rice grains. We always have good luck with brown rice, while white rice sometimes doesn’t work. If your experiment didn’t work and you don’t have brown rice, try raisins instead.
  3. Now pour in the vinegar and watch the grains dance up and down in the glass. The bubbles of carbon dioxide (from the reaction between baking soda and vinegar) adhere to each rice grain and make it float to the surface. But once up, the gas is released, so it sinks back down again. You can add more vinegar as you go.

 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#4 Balloon Fun

One can’t have a list of baking soda and vinegar activities without including this one. Basically, you use the power of a chemical reaction between the soda and vinegar to fill the balloon up for you. Can it get any more exciting? With this activity, you can learn about gas and chemical reactions while playing with balloons. Woo-hoo!

 

What you need

Baking soda – ⅓ cup

Vinegar- 1 cup

Plastic bottle

Balloon

Funnel

 

What to do

  1. Use a funnel to fill a balloon with ⅓ cup of baking soda.
  2. Now pour one cup of vinegar into a plastic bottle (the funnel will help).
  3. Fit the balloon over the bottle, trying not to drop any baking soda inside.
  4. Once the balloon is securely attached over the bottle, lift the balloon to let all the baking soda drop inside the bottle.
  5. Watch as the balloon fills with air.

 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#5 Plastic Baggie Explosion

Do you remember that the reaction between vinegar and baking soda creates carbon dioxide gas? In this experiment, the reaction is contained within a plastic bag. What do you think will happen if there is more carbon dioxide than the bag can hold? 😉 Hint: you might want to do this outside or in a clean-up friendly zone.  

 

What you need

2 tablespoons baking soda

½ cup vinegar

Sandwich size Ziploc bag

Tissue

 

What to do

  1. Put 2 Tablespoons of baking soda into the middle of the tissue and fold it up.
  2. Add half a cup of vinegar to the bag.
  3. You have to work quickly now. Throw the tissue into the bag and immediately zip it completely closed. Set it down and step back.
  4. Watch the bag expand and … POP!

 

If you want to have even more fun with this experiment, line up plastic bags and vary the amount of baking soda you put into them. We show how to do it in more detail HERE.

 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#6 Frozen Fizzies

For this activity, we used Star Wars ice tray molds. On the photo above the Millenium Falcon is under fire. For my kids, vinegar-filled droppers are the shooter, and fizzing chemical reaction is explosions. Hours of fun guaranteed!

 

What you need

½ cup baking soda

1 cup of water

Vinegar

Ice cube tray

 

(optional) food coloring

Dropper or spray bottle

 

What to do

  1. Dissolve baking soda in water and add food coloring (optional).
  2. Pour the mixture into ice cube trays and leave in the freezer overnight.
  3. Place frozen baking soda cubes on a tray.
  4. Sprinkle some vinegar on the cubes and watch them fizz.

 

How do you know that a chemical reaction occurred? 

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn

#7 Snow Day Any Day

Every day should be a snow day! Ummm, not really, but you can always make some fake snow and play all day!

Perhaps the longest-lasting baking soda and vinegar activity of all, this one can go on all day. As you can see in the photo above, my kids are engaged in pretty complex imaginative play involving snow-eating dinosaurs, speedy trucks, and blizzard. Everything that needs to be blasted with vinegar goes into a plastic container to keep the majority of “snow” intact. 

 

What you need

1 box of baking soda

Water

Vinegar

Squirt bottle

 

What to do

  1. Freeze a box of baking soda overnight.
  2. Pour frozen baking soda in a container.
  3. Slowly add water and mix it in with fingers or spoon until the desired consistency is reached. Our ideal consistency is when “the snow” forms into snowballs.
  4. (optionally) Make a snowman and blast it with a vinegar-filled squirt bottle!
  5. Fill a squirt bottle with vinegar, point it at the “snow,” and shoot. Warning: if more than one child is doing this activity at the same time, please, get out safety googles and position their chairs in such a way that they can’t shoot each other in the face.
  6. Watch the snow erupting. Hours of fun!

 

What’s your favorite baking soda and vinegar activity?

Your kids will never turn down an invitation to do baking soda and vinegar activities. #kidsactivities #STEAM #learningfun #creativelearningideas #kidminds #laughingkidslearn


Vinegar Safety

Even though vinegar is a common ingredient in many foods, it can cause serious injuries.

  • Stress to your kids that they should never drink or touch vinegar with their bare hands.
  • Tell them that to do any experiments containing chemical compounds, they need to act like scientists, and remain calm, cool, and collected at all times. I tell my kids to push a “Focus” button, something like putting on a Thinking Cap. Each of my kids found a different location for their button 🙂
  • Plus, they should never splash or shake containers with vinegar because if they get it in their eyes, it can result in a serious burn. As someone who once burned eyes by direct application of hydrogen peroxide, (long story!), I can attest first hand that eye burns are very uncomfortable.
  • Invest in kids’ safety goggles. They are light, and kids get used to wearing them during science demonstrations really fast. Plus, they help set the science-y mood and get kids ready to play professionals. 

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Simple chromatography experiments you can do with kids at home... with food coloring, candy sprinkles, essential oils, and two types of markers. #handsonlearning #chromatography #creativelearningideas

 

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